Are you tired of popping Pain Killers, then this TEN is for you all

People rely on drugs to get rid of pain-back pain , tooth ache, head-ache, muscle cramps and many more. But they come with the risk of side effects, drug interactions, and the possibility of becoming habit forming.

A quick look into current treatment plan

The most common medical treatment for inflammation is anti-inflammatory drugs which are effective symptom suppressors, providing pain relief, but do nothing to address the causes of the inflammation. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) work by blocking the production of the body’s inflammatory mediators, and while they are mostly very effective, they are not without side-effects, especially in the gut. When used long term, NSAIDS such as aspirin and ibruprofen can cause gastrointestinal bleeding and can put a strain on the liver. Recent studies have also shown that new anti-inflammatory drugs which inhibit important enzymes can double, or in some cases quadruple, a person’s chance of a heart attack. Despite this danger, the average person takes in excess of 300 doses of these painkillers a year! That’s six a week [4].

Rates of prescription painkiller sales, deaths and substance abuse treatment admissions (1999-2010)
Rates of prescription painkiller sales, deaths and substance abuse treatment admissions (1999-2010)

“Almost always, if we find pharmaceuticals doing the trick, we’ll find a plant doing the same trick—and doing it more safely,” remarks botanist James A. Duke, PhD, author of The Green Pharmacy Guide to Healing Food"

You will find the relief you need from a variety of natural painkillers. Many herbs and spices are available to treat inflammation and other pain related conditions in addition to well known candidates like turmeric, ginger etc. You could choose one from the below mentioned list

Willow bark:

willow-bark

Willow bark acts a lot like aspirin, so it is used for pain, including headache, muscle pain, menstrual cramps, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis, gout, and a disease of the spine called ankylosing spondylitis. Willow bark contains a chemical called salicin that is similar to aspirin. Willow bark’s pain relieving potential has been recognized throughout history. Willow bark was commonly used during the time of Hippocrates, when people were advised to chew on the bark to relieve pain and fever. Willow bark can is also used for fever, the common cold, flu, and weight loss [1]. One of the reasons people use willow bark as an alternative to aspirin is because it doesn’t produce the same side effects as aspirin.

Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause stomach irritation or damage, while willow bark taken in normal amounts does not [2]. Willow bark has been proven to be effective for back pain. In a well-designed study of nearly 200 people with low back pain, those who received willow bark experienced a significant improvement in pain compared to those who received placebo. People who received higher doses of willow bark (240 mg salicin) had more significant pain relief than those who received low doses (120 mg salicin) [3].

Boswellia:

Boswellia

Frankincense may be the ultimate gift for an arthritic friend. Boswellia serrata, also known as Indian Frankincense, is proving to be a very powerful natural anti-inflammatory agent, without the side-effects of current drugs. The therapeutic value of the dried resinous gum (guggul), derived from tapping the Boswellia tree, has been known since antiquity. In one study where patients initially received boswellic acid, and then later a placebo, arthritic symptoms significantly reduced while taking the Boswellia, but then returned with a vengeance when the treatment was switched over to placebo[4,5]. Boswellic acid is a potent inhibitor of lipoxygenase and thus works by different route in contrast to most NSAIDs which inhibit cyclooxygenase and shut down prostaglandin synthesis. This reduces leucotriene production, specifically LTB-4, an active chemotactic factor. This, most likely, accounts for the finding that Boswellia extract reduces leucocyte infiltration in carrageenin-induced pleurisy and has enjoyed a reputation as an effective therapeutic agent for arthritic diseases [5].

Hops:

hops

Hops are not just an ingredient in beer, but one of the most effective natural pain killers of all. The hop extract IsoOxygene is one of the most potent natural COX2 inhibitors. A recent study compared the effects of IsoOxygene to Ibuprofen: two tablets of Ibuprofen inhibited COX2 by 62 per cent, while IsoOxygene achieved a 56 per cent inhibition. Not only is it almost as effective, it doesn’t have the associated gut problems or other side-effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. You need about 500mg to 1500mg a day [5, 6]

Olive:

olives

Olives contain an extract called Hydroxytyrosol which has powerful anti-inflammatory effects. The active ingredient is a polyphenol, which has an antioxidant content over ten times greater than vitamin C. Olives also contain a compound called oleocanthal which is chemically related to ibuprofen, although again has none of the negative side effects. In 2005 researchers at the Monell https://www.acheterviagrafr24.com/prix-viagra-pharmacie/ Chemical Senses Center and University of the Sciences in the US found that oleocanthal was a potent anti-inflammatory painkiller. Although structurally dissimilar, both oleocanthal and Ibuprofen molecules inhibit the same cyclooxygenase enzymes in the prostaglandin-biosynthesis pathway [5, 7].

Ashwagandha:

ashwagandha

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is used in ayurvedic medicine for treating painful conditions such as osteoarthritis and rheumatism. Clinical and in vivo studies have shown this botanical to have anti-inflammatory activity. The active ingredients in this powerful anti-inflammatory herb are ‘withanolides’. In animal studies, Ashwaganda has proven highly effective against arthritis. In one study, animals with arthritis were given either Ashwaganda, hydrocortisone or placebo. While hydrocortisone produced a 44 per cent reduction in symptoms Ashwagandha produced an 89 per cent reduction in symptoms, making it substantially more effective [8].

Bromelain:

pineapple

What most people don’t realize about pineapple is that it’s infinitely more useful to humans than just as a garnish for tropical drinks. It’s literally true medicine! Bromelain is a collection of enzymes found in pineapples. Since it was first used in 1957, it has been shown to have a wide variety of medicinal properties – including the reduction of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. There are several mechanisms by which bromelain is believed to help. Firstly, it inhibits pro-inflammatory compounds and blocks the production of kinins, compounds which increase swelling and cause pain. Secondly, it helps reduce swelling by breaking down fibrin – a mesh that forms around an inflamed area, blocking off the blood supply and impairing tissue drainage [5]. The journal Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine published a research trial that evaluated 42 osteoarthritis patients with degenerative spine or painful joint conditions. Two 650 mg capsules of bromelain were given to the patients 2 – 3 times each day on an empty stomach (depending on whether they had acute or chronic pain) and it was discovered that pain decreased up to 60% for acute situations and more than 50% for chronic disorders [9]. Bromelain is sold in health food stores everywhere as a digestive aid. When used as a digestive aid it should be taken after meals, but when used for inflammation and pain, it is best taken between meals.

Kratom:

kratom

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is used in ayurvedic medicine for treating painful conditions such as osteoarthritis and rheumatism. Clinical and in vivo studies have shown this botanical to have anti-inflammatory activity. The active ingredients in this powerful anti-inflammatory herb are ‘withanolides’. In animal studies, Ashwaganda has proven highly effective against arthritis. In one study, animals with arthritis were given either Ashwaganda, hydrocortisone or placebo. While hydrocortisone produced a 44 per cent reduction in symptoms Ashwagandha produced an 89 per cent reduction in symptoms, making it substantially more effective [8].

Eucommia:

eucommia

It’s a kind of rubber tree. Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. (Family Eucommiaceae), also known as Dù-zhòng (Chinese: ), Tuchong (in Japanese), is the sole species of the genus Eucommia. The leaf, stem, and bark as well as staminate flower of Eucommia ulmoides have been traditionally used to cure many diseases in China, Japan, Korea, among others . The bark and leaves of eucommia are used in Chinese medicine for the relief of pain and to strengthen muscle, bones, and connective tissue, helping tissues to heal. It contains antioxidants that are thought to be responsible for its cell-protective nature. Eucommia reduces blood pressure and eases pain of osteoporosis with no side effects. Animal studies show that eucommia (both the bark and the leaves) might support

the development of healthy collagen, which is vital to healthy tissues. Derivatives of eucommia make for a perfect tea for back pain [11].

Feverfew:

feverfew

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) (Asteraceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used for the treatment of fevers, migraine headaches, rheumatoid arthritis, stomach aches, toothaches, insect bites, infertility, and problems with menstruation and labor during childbirth. Native to the Balkan Peninsula, feverfew is now found in Australia, Europe, China, Japan, and North Africa. The active compounds in feverfew include sesquiterpene lactones, predominantly parthenolide. Other phytochemicals include pyrethrin, volatile oils, tannins, bitter resin, and flavonoids. Feverfew appears to be an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis. A proposed mechanism of action involves parthenolide specifically binding to and inhibiting IκB kinase complex (IKK)β. IKKβ plays an important role in pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated signaling. Feverfew action does not appear to be limited to a single mechanism. Plant extracts affect wide variety of physiologic pathways; decrease of vascular smooth muscle spasm, and blockage of platelet granule secretion. Canada's Health Protection Branch granted a Drug Identification Number (DIN) for a British feverfew (T. parthenium) product, allowing the manufacturer, Herbal Laboratories Ltd, ottawa, Canada, to claim that this nonprescription drug prevents migraine headaches. The agency recommends a daily dosage of 125 mg of a dried feverfew leaf preparation from authenticated T. parthenium containing at least parthenolide 0.2% for the prevention of migraine [12].

Blue Lotus:

blue-lotus

Blue Lotus (Nymphaea Caerulea) is also known as Blue Water Lily and the Sacred Lily of the Nile. This flower can be used by both men and women as an aphrodisiac. It is a painkiller that is especially useful for relieving muscle spasms, migraines, and tinnitus (ringing in the ears). It can be smoked, which is especially beneficial for eliminating migraine headaches, since they usually accompany nausea. Blue lotus is reported to be "not as strong as codeine", but it is effective in remedying migraines, menstrual cramps, and various moderate pains. Blue Lotus contains nuciferan (a natural anti-spasmodic) along with aporphine, which will give you feelings of calming euphoria [13].

Word of Caution:

Always remember, pain is the body’s signal that something is wrong. It may be temporary, such as a strained muscle. But pain can also mean you have a serious health problem that needs a professional medical evaluation. Do not hesitate to seek healthcare expert. Diagnose the source of your pain, and then discuss some natural options for treating it.

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